Workplace


Visual Studio can be quite viral in my life. When I am “into” something or having to pick up a new technology or methodology, it is where I reside. This Sunday morning; it is a comfortable place to be!

The new project I am working on and the Entity Framework, in particular, are the objects of my latest bout of obsession.

I have had a particularly good week; for the first time in my current role, I am writing tests prior to code. Logging in on the weekend when there is nothing that has to be done is a very good indication of my happiness in work.

Scoping a task in tests is one of my favorite elements of TDD (and software development as a whole.) The effort to make the test suite be the best documentation of the elements they test is one that makes perfect sense to me. Developers will write document business rules which will be validated each time the test suite is run. In addition, I like writing tests; they increase my understanding of what I am doing.

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Well I have been back in the U.K just over two weeks and I have found the most fantastic job. I will be working in an agile shop with what seems to be a very strong team of developers. Throughout the two and a half hours I was on site interviewing and testing, I got the real feeling that their (and now my!) environment was one in which I could flourish and take the quality of my work to another level. I must convey my most heartfelt thanks to the wonderful folks at Mortimer-Spinks who put me forward for this role.

In the future, everyone will likely maintain two online profiles. So said LinkedIn CEO Dan Nye in an extended lunchtime interview last week here in Fortune’s conference room/pool hall. We had opened the conversation with THE question of the moment: in a Facebook world, what’s the future for LinkedIn — or for that matter any other “vertical” social network?

A great article on the good folk at LinkedIn.

Due to family commitments, I have left Victorian Epicure; today was my last day. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time with them and was very touched by the unsolicited letter of reference that the Director of I.T had put together for me. It made me think of how I had researched Epicure prior to applying (Monster, their site, Google.) So this is my unsolicited letter of reference for the firm as an employer.

If I had to pick just one word to describe working for Victorian Epicure it would be “Fantastic.”

In more than one word, the company as a whole (and the I.T. Department in specific) is built from good folk. There is a genuine warmth to the workplace that is a joy to be around. The company is growing and feeds from those at the top. I have NEVER worked somewhere where the commitment to the cause was so resolute at the top. It is infectious; I found it impossible not to invest myself at work when the directors did so so completely. When you couple that enthusiasm with a stellar corporate social responsibility ethic you create an entity that is so much more than just a business.

In all it’s future endeavours I wish Epicure and it’s people success and joy.

I am in my last few days of my current engagement and am trying to impart on my team mates the importance of communication before I go. The byline to that might have been “Explaining why I talk so much!”

  • Talk! Share your problems and achievements with your colleagues. Victories are more worthwhile and more common when you play as a team. Even a rage against the machine can be useful; your team will come running if you start hitting your monitor with your shoe!
  • Get a wheely chair! It is fun to shoot accross the office pretending to bugle the “Charge of Light Brigade” in response to a team members request for help.
  • Say “No!”, Pause, Say “YES!!!” If you “smell” an odour in what they are saying, be a devil’s advocate when someone maps out how they intend to do something. If they allay your fears be more emphatic with the “YES!” You will understand their course of action better and so will they.